The Exhibits

Permanent Exhibition: How Did We Get Here?

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Discover the evolution of music recording and listening from a single cylinder to the overcrowded i-Technologies. The Music Makers Museum’s permanent exhibition is How Did We Get Here?

Through the permanent exhibition discover media technology and voices from the past that explore how Americans have listened and collected music. How Did We Get Here? exhibition will open April 2018.  Check back regularly for updates.

Changing Exhibits

Music Makers Museum will host changing exhibits. Some changing exhibits will be from the museum’s collection. The museum will also consider items on loan for  specific exhibitions. If you have a collection related to music and music media technology and you would like a space to share it with the public on a temporary basis, please contact us. Check back often for news related to changing exhibits.

Virtual Exhibits

The Music Makers Museum will post online exhibitions with audios, graphics, videos and text. Enjoy the brief sample below and check back regularly for new exhibits.

Vernon Dalhart’s “The Wreck of the Old ’97” was the first country song to sell over a million copies. This success gave birth to country music as an industry. Click below to hear Dalhart’s original recording.

 

The Music Makers Museum houses a large collection of cylinder records. Thomas Edison’s invention of the tinfoil phonograph and Alexander Graham Belle’s improved wax cylinders led to the development of the recording industry. The cylinders were the first commercially sold records. People could now enjoy recorded music, speeches and comedy routines at home. The cylinders went through various stages of improvements. First came the Brown Wax (1895-1901), then Gold-Moulded (1902-1912), next Indestructible (1907-1922) and later Amberol (1908-1929) Cylinders. Click on the sound files below to explore original cylinder recordings from 1900-1925. The surface noise with its cracks and pops was part of the nuance of the early technology.

Sound Files:1900-1925